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2015 mustang unveiled

Discussion in '2015 V6 Mustang' started by DerangedGoose, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. 2011 Kona Blue

    2011 Kona Blue Active Member

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    Amen to that bro. The exterior design is just horrible. There is no muscle in the 2015. I have seen more muscle at the local Olive Garden Restaurant in a pasta dish. Really disappointing that this was the best the Ford design team could come up with was to stick a corporate Fusion fasica on the front.

    On a positive note, because of Fords really disappointig weak a$$ design they just saved me like 35k on buying a new car. Thanks Ford. :)
     
  2. Markstang

    Markstang Polishing my banhammer Staff Member

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    I don't really understand why some of you guys are hating on it so much. If you don't like it that's fine, but to keep posting about how bad it is, is pretty tiresome to people who kinda like it. Embrace what you like, ignore what you don't; everyone wins.
     
  3. 2011 Kona Blue

    2011 Kona Blue Active Member

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    Well you have a point but just too play devils advocate. Let me run this by you good sir. I personally don't understand why some are loving it or kind of liking it. If one likes it that's cool but for people to keep posting about how great and awesome looking it is, is pretty tiresome to people who kinda don't like it.

    I totally agree with you on embrace what one likes, don't buy what you don't like and its all good. But you have to remember, this is the internet and on the web we are all rock stars that our opinions get to be heard over and over and over. Ha, ha , ha ha.

    Here is where we come to feel heard and important. Lmao
     
  4. Markstang

    Markstang Polishing my banhammer Staff Member

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    Indeed, and the internet is also a place I can complain about how much you complain about things lol.
     
  5. 2011 Kona Blue

    2011 Kona Blue Active Member

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    I would completely agree with you my good sir. And truth be known I really want to like and love this new design. I had such high hopes for the next generation stang back when I bought my 2011 and all the talk about this next generation stang.

    Hopefully, the aftermarket world can help on some exterior changes and make a difference. If not, all good. I have my 2011 and most pleased.

    After my father seeing the 2015 model he quickly grabbed a 2014 CS 5.0 a few months ago. :)
     
  6. Tele-Caster

    Tele-Caster Member

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    Maybe I can help you understand. :)

    The current Mustang is not the sort of car Mustang has historically been in its most desirable incarnations or that many of us still want it to be. To me, the appeal to the Mustang was the same as that of many of the old British roadsters. in that Mustang was a fairly simple, relatively low-tech, straightforward, no-bullshit car -a car that, in spite of relying on technology more akin to a farm implement that a Ferrari, "punched above its technology class" in terms of performance potential and driving enjoyment. A Mustang was cheap to buy, cheap to maintain, and relatively easy to wrench on and therefore maintain to a high standard over a long period of ownership. It was an American performance car that didn't apologize for being American.

    The new Mustang is not that kind of car. It has more in common with the current Jaguar coupe than Mustangs of yore.

    At what point is a "pony car" no longer a pony car? I think we've reached it when the Mustang does what it does with the same level of technology and mechanical complexity found on a Jaguar or other rear-drive European car -multiple overhead cams, IRS, turbo inline fours.... It's not the car that's punching above its technology class anymore. It's not the car that could perform to a shockingly high standard with decades-old technology anymore. It's now thoroughly modern and much like any other rear-drive coupe made in Japan or Europe. It used to be distinctively American and different. Now it isn't.

    It used to be unique. When the '66 GT I had was new, what else was available that was like it for the same amount of money? When the '92 5.0 I had was new, NOTHING did what it did the way it went about doing it. No other performance car of that era was as easy to spin wrenches on and nothing captured the spirit of the original pony car like it did. Sure, GM had their F-bodies. I had one. It wasn't as home-wrench friendly as the mass-air 5.0 was, and it was so sanitary at the limit of adhesion that a nursing-home refugee grandma could have turned a hot lap in it. But in a 5.0? Methinks, perhaps, not... One had to have one's collective **** together to get everything out of the 5.0 that it had to offer. The first time I ran it around Willow Springs Raceway, one of the first thoughts that came to mind was that if that car were human, it would kill me just as soon as look at me. It was an adrenaline-pumping, visceral machine that said pushrod activated overhead valves and live rear drive axles with limited slip differentials weren't dead yet and still brought something to the table to be reckoned with. It said that you can keep your front-drive, high-revving Honda or other "rice d' jour," but as for me and my house, we shall uphold the live, rear-drive axle and good, old-fashioned, pushrod OHV 'Merican low end grunt. And it said all of that and more through the seductive burble of real dual exhaust. It captured the spirit of the original Mustang. It looked like a Mustang. It felt like a Mustang. It acted like a Mustang. Hell, it even SOUNDED like a Mustang. Pushing that thing to the limit of adhesion (and beyond, hehehe) was about as much fun as any red-blooded American male can ever hope to have while remaining fully clothed and in a seated position. With a Porsche 924S, a Trans Am, a race-prepped MG, a '73 Bronco, and the '66 GT in my garage, I needed another car like I needed another nut in my sack, but that 5.0 was irresistible because there really was nothing else like it back then and a lot of us wanted to get ours while the gettin' was good.

    This "Jaguar for the Common Man" that Mustang has become isn't that much different than other cars on the market now, aside from being less expensive than some. It's just as laden with complex technology and more bloated with road-hugging lard than many. It doesn't do what it does any differently now than another European rear drive performance car. And that seems to be what it has become -a "European" car made right here in the U.S.A.

    Having owned a Porsche, and looking forward to putting another one in the garage in the near future, I'm not against technology. On the other hand, having owned and enjoyed some pretty low tech things like Mustangs and MG Midgets and Triumph TR-4's, I believe that low tech has its advantages, too. I was and am a fan of Bunkie Knudsen's famous and oft-quoted quip that "parts left out don't break and don't cost anything." And I know from first-hand experience that the more complicated a car is, the more expensive and more difficult it is to maintain to a high standard over a long period of ownership.

    Something as technologically and mechanically complex as the new Mustang might well be a high performance car, but that doesn't translate in to long-term hobby car. There's more to a hobby car than skid-pad numbers and quater-mile times and oohing and ahhhhing over lists of technical specs, as the first Mustang proved. It wasn't the most technologically sophisticated car in the world or even the most high-tech car made in the U.S.A. back then, and yet it was an instant hit and remains cherished and coveted to this day.

    Time will tell, and I won't be around to see whether it does or doesn't, but I wouldn't be as shocked to see original Mustangs still running and looking good on the Marque's 100th anniversary as I would be to see a well-sorted, fully functional 2015.

    No, everyone doesn't win. The only winner is the one who is exhausted from reading opinions contrary to his own that no one is forcing him via threat of violence to read. I don't win and I'm not apathetic enough about what Mustang has always meant to me to resist fostering a dialogue on the subject of what a "pony car" was, what it should be, and what it has morphed in to.

    The Bean Counters at Ford are probably not loosing any sleep over my lack of enthusiasm for the "World Car" that Mustang has morphed in to in this incarnation, so nobody without a financial dog in the new Mustang's success or failure hunt should care, either. No doubt, the "Jaguar for the Common Man" will play well in the world market, but it doesn't play well with me. In so far as government regulations allow, I'd prefer my Mustang to look, feel, and drive like an American car without feeling like it has to apologize for it.
     
    2011 Kona Blue likes this.
  7. 2011 Kona Blue

    2011 Kona Blue Active Member

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    I was just about too say all that. You took the words right out of my mouth. Ha ha ha! Another enthusist who gets it. :)
     
  8. Markstang

    Markstang Polishing my banhammer Staff Member

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    You can't reasonably expect your mustang to remain the underdog that punches above its weight class if you keep sticking to the same old technology. If we did, you should be complaining that we ever moved away from the 289 with 3 or 4 speed manual transmissions. Technology advances and we have to keep up with the competitors. So when they move to direct fuel injection with their fancy 6 speed transmissions and independent rear suspensions and turbocharged small displacement engines, we have to do the same so that we're not the guys who "can only go in straight lines" because mustangs can't turn, or are the gas guzzling fat american cars because we have to keep the super inefficient carburetors because some people are not comfortable with advancing technology.

    Look, you love your 66 GT and the 92 GT, and that's fine, they're not going anywhere. You can keep loving them for all their simplicity and beauty. We can advance the technology of the current generation of Mustang without having anything to do with your beloved old fashioned simple tech cars. These new mustangs just aren't made for you. I understand that you're an older gentleman, or at least older than just a 'kid' like me at 24, and as such you're more inclined to object to change in the things that you love, but you should know by now that nothing is static. The weather isn't always the same, the laws always change, the markets go up and down, and performance expectations out of a mustang are higher than ever before because our competition gets better to imitate us.

    There's a point, and I think we've passed it with the introduction of variable cam timing in the 05 model years, where you can't keep up with everyone else just using simple mechanical systems. You need the computers to calculate how to adjust the cam timing so that you make that high end power without losing your low end grunt or idle quality. And eventually you'll need the computers to control the electronic shocks of future Mustangs' suspensions .

    You may not want to admit it, but the Mustang has had European influence and design characteristics from the beginning, their designers intentionally imitated european design. It has not become a "European" car built in America. It started out as a "European" car built in America. After the first couple years it became much more American with the harder body lines until it became completely unrecognizable as a Mustang with the foxbody era.

    Everyone does win, because the new mustang doesn't change what your old mustangs are and what they mean. So you don't need to get your jimmies rustled trying to get the younger guys to agree that the new mustang is losing its heritage. The new mustang simply broadens the market and will bring new mustang lovers from all around the world. The government regulations basically prohibit cars from being the simple machines they once were, what with all the safety requirements and fuel efficiency rules.

    lol no you weren't, you might agree with his sentiments but tele-caster is unique in the length of his posts.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
    Tele-Caster likes this.
  9. 2011 Kona Blue

    2011 Kona Blue Active Member

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    lol no you weren't, you might agree with his sentiments but tele-caster is unique in the length of his posts.[/QUOTE]

    Ha ha ha ha. I wasn't gonna say 2/3 that. Lol. I'm only 40 so I'm all about technology and progress. No problem there. I just wish Ford didn't make the new mustang so unattractive and non muscle car looking. It just looks like some euro sports car that has a identity crisis. But I'm all for the gadgets and tech stuff. IRS, rock out. I couldn't give a monkeys nut, either way it's all good to me. I just want it too look the part and it doesn't.
     
  10. Tele-Caster

    Tele-Caster Member

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    I've got a hunch that my knickers aren't nearly as twisted over my lack of love for the new Mustang as yours are over knowing that some people don't really dig it all that much..

    I don't know why you're compelled to make like or dislike of the new Mustang a generational issue, but since you broached the subject, I fundamentally don't care how another person spends their money as long they aren't infringing on my liberty doing it. So I really don't care how many of you youngsters go ga-ga over the "Jaguar for the Common Man" Ford has positioned the Mustang to be. I might be old enough to be your..... Uh.... Never mind..... I'm not that person, so if spending new Mustang money to get your hands on one sparks your plug, hop to it and buy one. I sincerely hope you like it if you do, and I expect that you probably would.
     
  11. Tele-Caster

    Tele-Caster Member

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    [QUOTE="Markstang, post: 4829260, member: 33811" After the first couple years it became much more American with the harder body lines until it became completely unrecognizable as a Mustang with the foxbody era.[/QUOTE]


    If the 5.0 Fox is "unrecognizeable" to you as a real Mustang, then I'm sure you're gonna LOVE this 2015 version.


    [