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Getting Back in the Saddle

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by David Roddick, Apr 11, 2019.

  1. David Roddick

    David Roddick New Member

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    Greetings all. I'm looking at getting my 5th Mustang. Currently the stable is empty. I've had a 66 coupe 6 with 3pd stick that I bought from original owner, restored it, and sold it. Had a 93 project car that I put a newer engine in - sold it. Had a 05 V6 that I loved until I found a 08 Bullitt that I traded the 05 for. Eventually sold the Bullitt. After a couple years with no Mustang, I'm looking at getting a 2014 to 2017 V6 automatic with no more than 50K miles. Here's an early question: I found a 2012 V6 that I love except it has 89K. Pony package - nice car but miles over my target. I never had any issue with Mustangs engines other than the 93 (which I knew was bad when I bought the car), but wondering everyone's feelings about 89K knowing that I plan to daily drive it. Thoughts?
     
  2. Tele-Caster

    Tele-Caster Member

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    Mine isn't a 2012 and it doesn't have 89K on it, but I do daily drive it with 209K on it.

    And why not? It runs great. Everything works like it is supposed to. Prior-owner neglect got all sorted out long ago. I'm not going to be stranded somewhere due to a snapped accessory drive belt or busted hose, because I change those things periodically as part of keeping the car maintained.

    I bought mine with 196K on it. I decided to buy it after test-driving it because it felt to be the quickest of all the V6's I drove. Because it had 198K on it, and was over 10 years old when I bought it, I could leverage that to my advantage, offering a Jeep dealer a firm $1,200.00 and getting up, heading for the door, and bidding them "good luck at the auction" until they said "Yes." First real drive was the 80 miles from the Jeep dealer to my home, with a pit-stop at a truck scale on the way. Second drive was a 160 mile round trip with some drag strip passes in between.

    Knowing what the car weighed, I could use the drag strip and math to get a handle on the health of the engine. The car ran 15.7-15.8, which is what a car of its weight that should be getting about 155-160 to the rear wheels should run. It was doing that with 196K on the odo.

    Now, to be fair, it turns out that the car's engine was a "genuine Ford re-manufactured" unit that only had about 60,000 miles on it when I bought the car. The dealer said it did, but couldn't back the claim with documentation, so I didn't believe them. I found proof in cleaning and detailing the car.

    Dealer's story was that prior owner ran engine low on coolant, blew head gasket when it overheated, hydro-locked the engine trying to restarted, causing need for new one. She had warranty from the place she bought the car from. Engine was replaced under warranty. Whether it should have been or not is someone else's problem.

    But the documentation I found in the car seemed to collaborate the story the dealer I bought from told, which I didn't believe. There was a tow bill from the place of breakdown to a Ford dealer, there was a bill for diagnosis from the dealer, documentation of diagnosis and recommendation of install of rebuilt engine, and all the paperwork dealing with the installation of the engine, the warranty claim, and so on. I found this stuff under the spare tire.

    Here's the thing, though..... Car engines last an order of magnitude longer than they did when I was a kid in the 60's and 70's. I credit unleaded gasoline and electronic fuel injection for that. Electronic fuel injection largely prevents cylinder washout on start-up, when a bunch of engine wear occurs. In a sense, today's 100K is like yesterday's 50K, at least where the long block is concerned.

    Buying a used car is still a crap-shoot, though, regardless of mileage. I would rather have a 100K car that was correctly maintained than a 50K car that had zero maintenance.

    Personally, I wouldn't let 89K prevent me from buying a car I liked. I reckon I'd get another 100K or maybe even 200K out of the engine.
     
    David Roddick likes this.
  3. David Roddick

    David Roddick New Member

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    Thanks. I've always considered them good cars. The only car that I ever had issues with was the 94 and I knew before I bought it the engine was needing help. But even enjoyed replacing the engine. Since the one I buy will be my "daily" I want to try to be sure it's dependable. So I'll take my time and find the "right one" as best I can determine.