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Lowering and Tie Rods/Suspension Parts

Discussion in '1994-2004 V6 Mustang Tech' started by V6 Stang Tuner, Jun 4, 2019.

  1. V6 Stang Tuner

    V6 Stang Tuner Member

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    I'm in the process of lowering my Stang 1.5" front and rear with Eibach springs and have replacement struts and mounts, and was wondering what other less expensive parts are recommended to change as well (already decided I won't be doing caster/camber plates).

    On my previous cars it was usually recommended to change the tie rods in front, as these are cheap so its a good time to swap these out. On my last car, a Cobalt, it was recommended to use the SS models tie rods as they were longer and worked better with the lowered suspension.

    Are the tie rods a good item to change on the v6 mustang as well and are the GT/V8 ones a good alternative to the stock v6 one's?
     
  2. 08'MustangDude

    08'MustangDude Profile Violation

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    Lowering WILL effect camber. Other than that, if you are not getting the correction
    plates, then there is nothing else to worry about. Maybe, adjustable end links
    for the front sway-bar to make up for the geometry change. You don't need
    stronger anything for a lowered car, it just sits lower...
     
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  3. 6 Shooter

    6 Shooter Well-Known Member

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    Need to add a bumpsteer kit to change the angle of the tie rods to the lowered A-arms.
     
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  4. 08'MustangDude

    08'MustangDude Profile Violation

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    No you don't "NEED" to, because you won't know you have it till
    you drive it first. Then you need to have the car lined up after the
    install. Lowering can cause an undesirable toe angle in the alignment
    after the drop. Bump steer is when the toe angle changes when going
    over bumps, or dips, brake dive, or any movement of the suspension;
    and thus the suspension steers the car, not you.

    The "A" arm angle changes, it is not lowered. When the front end of your
    car dips, the angle changes. Lowering, is like keeping the "A" arm at that
    angle for ride height. The issue is the tie-rod ends relative height to the
    rack-n-pinion unit. So, if you get bumpsteer, you need to alter the height
    and length of the outer tie-rod end relative to the steering rack.

    You are not guaranteed to have bumpsteer either, and most cars will never be
    able to have an absolute zero bumpsteer. Specs are that the car must have less
    than 1/64-inch of toe movement for normal operations so you don't feel it.
    Also, the wider and more low profile your tires are, the more you will feel it.
    The taller 16" tire, the tire tucks and absorbs some of the bupsteer rather than
    it translate to bumpsteer at the steering-wheel. As you go up to 17" and higher
    rims, the tire profile is lower, they're wider thus you will feel bumpsteer because
    the tire is also less forgiving.

    It all depends how LOW you want to go. 1" down isn't going to change much.
    If all you're doing is to reduce the gap from tire to fender, 1" would be fine.
    If you want low rider, tires up into the fender-well low, then you need a kit.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2019
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  5. V6 Stang Tuner

    V6 Stang Tuner Member

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    Will be putting in outer tie rods and checking the endlink bushings then and swap them with new ones if needed.

    Will drill out the rivets in the stock caster/camber plate if needing more adjustment for the alignment after everything is installed.