Mozilla introduces Firefox mobile OS

idioteque

Pine away for your banner years.
This project seems interesting. They look a little late with IOS and Android so dominant, but I don't think Mozilla would spend time in this project if they didn't think it could be successful. Maybe some of the programmer types around here could explain the built on HTML5 thing a little more.


Mozilla, the company behind the Firefox web browser, is planning a completely open mobile operating system, and today it revealed its official name: Firefox OS.

The first Firefox OS devices are expected in 2013, and Mozilla has already lined up some extensive support for the project. China’s ZTE and TCL, two large phone manufacturers, said they would build devices using Qualcomm Snapdragon processors, the same kind of chip in the Samsung Galaxy S III.

In addition, wireless carriers throughout the world have voiced support for Firefox OS, including Deutsche Telekom (the parent of T-Mobile), Etisalat (which operates in 18 countries throught the Middle East, Asia and Africa), Sprint in the U.S. and Spain’s Telefónica, which will release the first Firefox devices in Brazil.

Mozilla says Firefox OS will be a “fully open mobile ecosystem,” built entirely on open web standards, with apps developed as HTML5 applications. HTML5 is a standard for supporting advanced functionality in web pages — when an app launches in your smartphone’s browser instead of as a native app, chances are it was made with HTML5.

Firefox OS is a rechristening of Mozilla’s “Boot to Gecko” project, a plan to create a mobile OS around the company’s Gecko layout engine, used by many open-source software projects. By basing the entire OS on open web standards, HTML5 apps will be able to take advantage of aspects of the device that are often restricted to native apps on other platforms — things such as hardware acceleration.

The phone’s basic functions — calling, messaging, calendar, etc. — will all be based on HTML5, too, opening up even more possibilities for developers. For example, a developer could create an app that could view and analyze your text-messaging history, or even send texts automatically in certain situations.

While Android is often cited as an “open” platform as well, it’s not based on entirely open standards, as the recent Google-Oracle lawsuit has shined a light on. Also, the devices often have some restrictions imposed by either Google or the carriers. “Rooting” devices is possible to open up more functionality, but few consumers actually do so.

What do you think of the announcement of Firefox OS? Check out a couple of samples of how the new OS will look below, then share your thoughts in the comments.
 
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DerangedGoose

ಠ_à²
After how much time I've wasted on something as simple as getting an Android ROM to work as smoothly as it should (and keep functioning that way months down the line), Im just as skeptical of another open source standard being able to deliver any better. Especially in the beginning.
 

chaoticdismay

the rippin and the tearin
After how much time I've wasted on something as simple as getting an Android ROM to work as smoothly as it should (and keep functioning that way months down the line), Im just as skeptical of another open source standard being able to deliver any better. Especially in the beginning.
Android OS is Java based *shudders*. Add to that the multitude of hardware companies and that they can alter the OS to suit their needs and you have one giant cluster**** of a device.

I like where this is heading.
 

Kuplex

Retired Admin
Android OS is Java based *shudders*. Add to that the multitude of hardware companies and that they can alter the OS to suit their needs and you have one giant cluster**** of a device.

I like where this is heading.
Bingo. Java is not the best (I really hope Mono takes off to allow C# development of Android apps/ROMs) but the real problem with lag has been the way the touch interface was handled (ie: implemented poorly) up until Jelly Bean, only partially covered up by cranking up the hardware specs. There are also other things that attributes to what users see as lag. For example, in iOS, if you scroll a loading web page it's smooth because it stops loading and gives priority to the touch handlers. In Android, this does not interrupt the loading, so you are trying to scroll and move at the same time.
The carrier/manufacturer overlays are just another way to completely **** up the user experience. Sense, TouchWiz, Motoblur...doesn't matter. They **** up Android in one way or another. They were more welcomed when they added a better look and feel to Android 2.3 and earlier devices. With 4.0+, they simply **** it up from making it look like some Android 2.3 rendition again to botched settings like HOX's overly aggressive memory management that practically destroys multi-tasking.

The only thing I don't like about FireFox OS (unless it's changed) is they want to give manufacturers/carrier complete control over the OS. Unless Mozilla has their own line of vanilla ROM devices or the community can flash vanilla ROMs on it, I wouldn't touch it with a 10ft pole. Manufacturers and carrier **** it all up. If nothing else, Apple made the right choice in preventing them from screwing with the OS.
 
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